Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Telecom and Tech Companies Are Government Agents

Centralization of the means of communication and transport in the hands of the State
-6th Plank of the Communist Manifesto
Sources: TechCrunch, Law Enforcement Increasingly Using Google Search Warrants, United States v. Wilson

All means of communication are controlled by the federal government. So called ‘private’ telecommunications and tech companies such as Verizon Wireless, Sprint, and Google don’t just offer us a means of communicating and storing data; they are also tools of mass surveillance. These companies are little more than extensions of the executive branch who save police the cost and trouble building their own surveillance network.

In 2018, the NSA conducted some 9,637 targeted warrantless searches of the contents of our phone calls, texts, and emails, which was a 28% increase from the previous year. However, this is a conservative estimate that doesn’t account for search queries made by domestic law enforcement who also have access to the Bulk data collection. These warrantless searches, authorized under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, allow the NSA to collect data on both foreign nationals and American citizens from telecommunications and tech companies in secret, which then allows Law Enforcement to obtain fruit of the poisonous tree (i.e. evidence obtained without probable cause), under Executive Order 12333, and prosecute people using parallel construction

It was recently revealed, what we sort of already knew, that Google is also used as a means for dragnet surveillance. One man learned this the hard way. Jorge Molina was arrested for a murder he did not commit and spent a week in jail until he was able to prove his innocence. The only evidence linking him to the crime was his google data. Unlike traditional search warrants that specify person and place, police are now using google warrants to obtain the location data of all phones that have been near a crime, in other words, anyone who has ever walked or drove past a crime scene is now a suspect. Unfortunately for Jorg, the perpetrator, his mother’s ex-boyfriend, used his Honda Civic in the commission of the crime and he had just happened to be in the vicinity of the crime scene beforehand. Location tracking isn’t the only thing that Google does for police. An amicus brief filed in the case of United States v. Wilson reveals that Google also maintains an image matching algorithm that supposedly detects any child pornography uploaded through Gmail. While this might seem like a noble cause, there is no publicly available information on how this algorithm is able to detect child pornography by matching the hash value of images. There is also a much greater potential for abuse than simply falsely identifying images as child pornography. An image matching algorithm could also be used to keep tabs on members of subversive political movements, something Federal Law Enforcement agencies like the FBI have historically done to suppress political dissent.

None of this should be surprising. These same events precipitated during the height of the cold war (e.g. Project SHAMROCK, Project Minaret, COINTELPRO etc) and since the war on terror is in sense the new cold war, mass surveillance has become fashionable again.

Florida City Threatens To Steal Man's Home For Failure to Cut Grass



Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted
- 8th Amendment to The Constitution

Sixty-nine year old Florida resident Jim Ficken may lose his house simply for failing to mow his lawn. The city of Dunedin, Florida has burdened him with $30,000 in fines because he let his grass grow over 10 inches for two consecutive months last year. Jim was unable to mow his lawn due to extenuating circumstances outside of his control. Last summer, he left town to arrange his mother's estate and paid a friend to mow his lawn while he was gone. However, his friend died, without his knowledge, and the grass continued to grow unabated. City Bureaucrats began assessing fines of $500 per day for each day that the grass remained over 10 inches tall. By the time Jim came home, the city had assessed $30,000 in fines. Jim mowed his lawn to remedy the code violation and tried to negotiate a smaller penalty, but the city refused to budge. Since Jim is retired and lives on a fixed income, he cannot afford to pay the absurd penalty, so the city has decided to foreclose on his home, potentially rendering him homeless. Imagine being such a draconian psychopath that you would you force someone to live on the streets just because they failed to cut their grass for reasons outside of their control.

This case needs no further explanation; it is obviously absurd to evict a homeowner from their own house for failing to maintain a certain aesthetic, but running extortion rackets is what governments do best. Apparently, this particular city has been able to run one of the most successful code enforcement rackets in the country as they've been able to increase revenue from code violation fines 20x over the past decade from a measly $34,000 in 2007 to an impressive $1.3 million in 2018, which is probably the majority of their revenue. Despite the absurdity of the penalty, Jim does not have a guaranteed victory here. The Supreme Court has struck down similar schemes as unconstitutional, but they have never set a clear standard for excessive fines and fees. They have only recommended that it should not exceed a person's ability to pay, which most municipal governments routinely ignore by seizing property and often jailing residents who cannot afford to pay the fines levied against them. The Supreme court also has a poor track record defending property rights; they allow law enforcement agencies to take people's property without securing a criminal conviction and allow eminent domain takings of property for economic development purposes. Allowing this injustice to occur is not outside the range of possibility.


Thursday, May 2, 2019

Illegal Aliens are Receiving Welfare Benefits Through Stolen Identities

Source: Immigration and Customs Enforcement

One of the most misleading leftist talking points on illegal immigration is that illegal aliens don’t receive welfare benefits because they are ineligible. This is only half true; while they are ineligible for programs like Medicaid and CHIP, it doesn’t stop them from breaking the law to receive benefits. About a week ago ICE, in conjunction with a Boston Police task force, arrested twelve Dominican nationals for document and benefit fraud. The suspects used the identities of U.S. citizens from Puerto Rico, including their SSNs, to commit crimes and receive government benefits in the names of the victims of their identity theft. Ten of the suspects were illegal aliens, one was a legal permanent resident and one still had a pending application. Six of them had previous criminal records in the names of the victims of their identity theft.

This case is part of our ongoing effort to target federal crime in the Lawrence area,” said U.S. Attorney Andrew E. Lelling, “and we will keep up the pressure for as long as necessary. The 12 men and women charged allegedly stole and used the identities of U.S. citizens to live illegally in the United States, receive government benefits in the names of their victims, and even commit crimes in the names of those victims. This is a rampant problem, and my office is committed to helping those whose identities have been compromised to regain control over their lives.

As you might already suspect, this isn’t an isolated incident. Last year, the same LEOs arrested twenty-five illegal aliens, on similar charges, who had defrauded the federal government out of $250,000 in benefits including $200,000 for healthcare; this is just the tip of the iceberg. It is estimated that taxpayers subsidize the healthcare of illegal aliens to the tune of $18.5 billion annually including $11.2 billion for federal programs such as the ACA and Medicaid. Of course, not all of this cost is borne through identity theft. Most of it comes from uncompensated care costs in hospitals and states like California that provide healthcare coverage to illegal aliens through state only programs.

When Exceptions to Our Rights Become The Norm

Source: KATV Little Rock News

What happened to Roderick Talley was not an isolated incident. The Little Rock narcotics unit served approximately 1,600 warrants over the past decade. Nearly all of them were no knock warrants. The Little Rock narcotics unit requested no knock warrants in all but 80 cases, and it appears they had a slight racial bias; 67% of the suspects targeted were black men. For comparison, black males only make up about 20% of the population of Little Rock. In Roderick Talley’s case, the no knock warrant was based on false information from a police informant. Talley did not have any cocaine on him, as alleged by police, but they still tried to drag him through the court system and it is very likely that others suffered a similar fate. Even though the Supreme Court requires individualized language in search warrants and probable cause affidavits, nearly every affidavit and warrant contained language justifying their exemption to the knock and announce common law standard, recognized in Wilson v. Arkansas, that had been copied from previous affidavits and warrants. None of the affidavits mentioned the individual suspect’s ability to destroy evidence or history of violence and only 23 of them even mentioned the suspect’s access to firearms. To add injury to insult, less than five percent of the suspects targeted in these no knock raids ended up in jail. The majority of no knock raids resulted in probation time for the suspects and many more resulted in no charges at all. Innocent people targeted in no knock raids do not go unscathed. Talley was relatively lucky to only suffer minor bruises from having his apartment door blown on top of him, many others were not as lucky. Babies have been maimed by SWAT teams indiscriminately using explosives. Innocent men, fathers who were only guilty of trying to protect their family from people they thought were burglars, have been killed by police in no knock raids. Like all wars, the drug war has produced a lot of collateral damage, mainly our constitutional rights and the innocent men, women and children that it was supposedly intended to protect from drug dealers.




Thursday, April 25, 2019

Molested By The State: Warrantlesss Strip Searches of Children

Source: Home School Legal Defense Association

This case pertains to a four year old child, identified pseudonymously as I.B. in the amicus brief, who was strip searched against her will and photographed by a CPS caseworker at preschool. The strip search was conducted as part of a child welfare investigation without probable cause that the little girl had been physically abused or neglected.

‘When the child’s mother, who is listed as Jane Doe, picked I.B. up from preschool one day her daughter asked, Mommy, do you remember when the woman with white hair came to my school? I hope she doesn’t come again, because I don’t like it when she takes all my clothes off.

The little girl’s horrified mother immediately contacted the preschool, but the teachers assured her that nothing had happened. Unsatisfied, Jane continued to press the school on the issue.

Weeks later, the school finally revealed that, during a child abuse investigation, a caseworker, Ms. Woodard, had strip-searched I.B.

Eventually, the investigator admitted that she had not only taken I.B’s clothes off against her will, but she had also taken color photographs of the child’s naked body. After finding that no abuse had occurred, Woodard had simply closed the investigation.’

While this was conducted at a formal preschool, the case has far reaching implications for home schooled children as well who have been subjected to the same warrantless searches in previous years. In the 1999 case of Calabretta v. Floyd, a CPS investigator entered a home without a warrant and strip searched a three year old child. The Ninth circuit court held this to be a violation of the family’s 4th and 14th amendment rights against unreasonable searches and seizures. A similar case occurred in Roe v. Texas Dept of Protective and Regulatory Services, wherein a 6 year old child was not only strip searched but also subjected to a ‘genital examination.’

Aside from concerns about the constitutional rights of parents and the psychological harm that strip searches and ‘genital examinations’ may inflict on children, this also brings the privacy rights of children to the forefront. Children have the same human rights, and ,to a certain extent, the same constitutional rights (delineated in the bill of rights), as adults. Sure children cannot vote, hold public office, enter into contracts, consent to participate in scientific studies, drive or consume alcohol but this is due to diminished autonomy rather than an absence of rights. The same restrictions often apply to adults with mental and physical disabilities, yet they are not stripped of their constitutional and human rights and relegated to an inferior legal status like convicted criminals. Likewise, a person who becomes unconscious doesn’t suddenly lose their rights and then regain them upon regaining consciousness. In relation to actions taken by the state or any public authority, children have the same rights as adults, which includes the right to privacy and the right to refuse unreasonable searches and seizures; these rights do not suddenly kick in at a certain age. Although a special exception could be made for infants and other children who are non-verbal, and we would have to defer to the mother or caretaker, we should recognize that just as children are not subject to the arbitrary and capricious will of their parents or guardians (i.e. restrictions on child abuse) they also should not be subject arbitrary and capricious actions of the state or public authorities (e.g. privacy rights). The fact that children are usually unaware of their rights makes this even more critical.

Predicting and Preventing Chronic Homelessness

Source: The Economic Round table

All incidents of homelessness are not the same; in fact, much of it is short lived so approaching homelessness with a one-size fits all solution would be wasteful and ineffective. The majority of people who become homeless recover, often with little outside help, within a year. However, about 40% of people who become homeless stay homeless for at least a year or experience two or more episodes of homelessness within three years. So why do some people stay perpetually homeless while others find a way out? There are several factors that could explain the difference between these two populations. The chronically homeless have significantly higher rates of serious mental illness, physical disabilities, chronic physical illness, substance abuse, alcohol abuse, severe depression, PTSD, developmental disabilities and traumatic brain injuries. For instance, about 55% of chronically homeless persons have a serious mental illness compared to only 21% of those who escape homelessness within a year. About 39% of the chronically homeless have a physical disability compared to only 16% of those who experience short-term homelessness, and about 38% of the chronically homeless suffer from a chronic physical illness compared to only 16% of those who experience short-term homelessness. About 37% of the chronically homeless engage in drug abuse compared to only 14% of those who experience short-term homelessness. However as I explained in ‘Is Chronic Homelessness a Mental Health Problem’, while certain factors such as mental illness and substance abuse disorder are closely associated with chronic homelessness they are not necessarily the cause of chronic homelessness; these factors are both predictors and risk factors for chronic homelessness. The stressors of homelessness could actually result in these disorders that then reinforce homelessness. Having a method for differentiating between individuals who are likely to become chronically homeless and individuals who are likely to escape homelessness is the first step towards finding interventions that will reduce the chronically homeless population.

Predictive Model

A cohort study of the homeless population of Los Angeles county over a fifteen year period, conducted with a sample size of one million, assessed numerous risk factors for homelessness, and constructed a predictive model to estimate the probability of newly homeless individuals becoming chronically homeless. All low-wage workers are at risk of becoming chronically homeless if they lose their jobs but this risk varies depending on certain demographic characteristics; in particular, the risk is highest for low wage workers who are male, single and African American. A third of low-wage workers who become chronically homeless do so before they lose their job. A third also hold down jobs despite physical and mental impairments. These disabilities occur more often and become more debilitating when they lose their jobs. In general, people who become chronically homeless tend to have a history of job turnovers, underemployment and low wages. Providing comprehensive re-employment services, including education and job training, to low wage workers as soon as they lose their job would reduce the risk of chronic homelessness. Additionally, providing health care support to unemployed low wage workers with physical disabilities would improve their re-employment and job retention prospects. Chronically homeless individuals who have a criminal record and a history of substance and/or alcohol abuse will need behavioral health services or compulsory rehab along with legal services to expunge their record to gain re-employment prospects.

For young adults who enter adulthood homeless, the most reliable predictors of homelessness are six prior years of homelessness as an adolescent and prior time in foster care. Individuals who experience six prior years of homelessness as adolescents are three times as likely to experience homelessness as adults than individuals who were not homeless as adolescents. While only 5% of young adults come out of foster care, 13% of young adults who become chronically homeless come out of foster care. Additionally, homeless youth are more likely to be employed than their non-homeless counterparts but earn lower wages. Here too, education and job training programs would provide upward mobility.

The Public Incentive

Chronic homelessness is a taxpayer burden regardless of whether governments address it or not. Individuals who become chronically homeless have far higher public costs than non-homeless individuals. Healthcare costs are five times higher for chronically homeless workers and four times higher for chronically homeless youth than the general population. Justice system costs are nine times higher for chronically homeless workers and seven times higher for chronically homeless youth than the general population. Creating interventions tailored to meet the needs of people who have a higher risk of becoming chronically homeless will not only reduce the need for permanent supportive housing, but also reduce financial strain on local criminal justice and healthcare systems.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Interest on National Debt Projected to Approach $1 Trillion in a Decade

'As long as mankind continue to pay "national debts," so-called -- that is, so long as they are such dupes and cowards as to pay for being cheated, plundered, enslaved, and murdered -- so long there will be enough to lend the money for those purposes; and with that money a plenty of tools, called soldiers, can be hired to keep them in subjection. But when they refuse any longer to pay for being thus cheated, plundered, enslaved, and murdered, they will cease to have cheats, and usurpers, and robbers, and murderers and blood-money loan-mongers for masters.'
-Lysander Spooner, No Treason: The Constitution of No Authority VII

Although the federal government cannot technically become insolvent; there are other undesirable consequences to exceeding its constitutional duties. While the national debt is not exactly like a household debt, since the federal government is technically a “sovereign currency issuer”, it still has to be paid with interest like a household debt and that interest payment is growing rapidly. In fact, according to CBO net interest on the national debt is the fastest growing portion of the congressional budget. CBO estimates that net interest on the national debt will grow by 248% over the next decade, much faster than GDP growth over the same time period (55%) or any category of congressional spending including healthcare spending (96%).

In the current fiscal year, congress spent nearly $400 billion paying the net interest on the national debt, about 9% of the total congressional budget (both discretionary and non-discretionary). This exceeds the amount spent on programs like SNAP, SSI and unemployment benefits. By 2028, the net interest on the national debt will climb to at least $914 billion or as high as $992 billion, constitute 3% of GDP, and exceed all categories of discretionary spending including defense spending. The U.S. is expected to pay approximately $7 trillion in interest on the national debt for the next decade.

It should be remembered that discretionary spending, currently about $1.3 trillion, is only a fraction of the annual congressional budget; in fact, it is less than half the budget. Most of the budget is non-discretionary or mandatory spending that congress does not get to approve on an annual basis. Any attempt to “balance the budget” through spending cuts or tax hikes would be futile.

Monday, April 15, 2019

Molested By The State: Warrantlesss Strip Searches of Children

Source: Home School Legal Defense Association

This case pertains to a four year old child, identified pseudonymously as I.B. in the amicus brief, who was strip searched against her will and photographed by a CPS caseworker at preschool. The strip search was conducted as part of a child welfare investigation without probable cause that the little girl had been physically abused or neglected.

‘When the child’s mother, who is listed as Jane Doe, picked I.B. up from preschool one day her daughter asked, “Mommy, do you remember when the woman with white hair came to my school? I hope she doesn’t come again, because I don’t like it when she takes all my clothes off.”
The little girl’s horrified mother immediately contacted the preschool, but the teachers assured her that nothing had happened. Unsatisfied, Jane continued to press the school on the issue.
Weeks later, the school finally revealed that, during a child abuse investigation, a caseworker, Ms. Woodard, had strip-searched I.B.
Eventually, the investigator admitted that she had not only taken I.B’s clothes off against her will, but she had also taken color photographs of the child’s naked body. After finding that no abuse had occurred, Woodard had simply closed the investigation.’

While this was conducted at a formal preschool, the case has far reaching implications for home schooled children as well who have been subjected to the same warrantless searches in previous years. In the 1999 case of Calabretta v. Floyd, a CPS investigator entered a home without a warrant and strip searched a three year old child. The Ninth circuit court held this to be a violation of the family’s 4th and 14th amendment rights against unreasonable searches and seizures. A similar case occurred in Roe v. Texas Dept of Protective and Regulatory Services, wherein a 6 year old child was not only strip searched but also subjected to a ‘genital examination.’

Aside from concerns about the constitutional rights of parents and the psychological harm that strip searches and ‘genital examinations’ may inflict on children, this also brings the privacy rights of children to the forefront. Children have the same human rights, and ,to a certain extent, the same constitutional rights (delineated in the bill of rights), as adults. Sure children cannot vote, hold public office, enter into contracts, consent to participate in scientific studies, drive or consume alcohol but this is due to diminished autonomy rather than an absence of rights. The same restrictions often apply to adults with mental and physical disabilities, yet they are not stripped of their constitutional and human rights and relegated to an inferior legal status like convicted criminals. Likewise, a person who becomes unconscious doesn’t suddenly lose their rights and then regain them upon regaining consciousness. In relation to actions taken by the state or any public authority, children have the same rights as adults, which includes the right to privacy and the right to refuse unreasonable searches and seizures; these rights do not suddenly kick in at a certain age. Although a special exception could be made for infants and other children who are non-verbal, and we would have to defer to the mother or caretaker, we should recognize that just as children are not subject to the arbitrary and capricious will of their parents or guardians (i.e. restrictions on child abuse) they also should not be subject arbitrary and capricious actions of the state or public authorities (e.g. privacy rights). The fact that children are usually unaware of their rights makes this even more critical.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Social Media Censorship is a Violation of The First Amendment

There is a lot of ignorance on this topic. People who favor of social media censorship of certain political persuasions claim that the first amendment only prohibits congress from abridging freedom of speech and that it does not apply to private companies like Twitter or Facebook or YouTube. Aside from the fact that the 14th amendment makes first amendment protections applicable to all levels of government, it also makes it applicable to corporations who allow the general public to use their property and who serve a public function. This is not just my personal opinion; although I wholeheartedly agree with the sentiment, it is the U.S. Supreme court ruling handed down in Marsh v. Alabama 326 U.S. 501

Many people in the United States live in company-owned towns. [n5] These people, just as residents of municipalities, are free citizens of their State and country. Just as all other citizens, they must make decisions which affect the welfare of community and nation. To act as good citizens, they must be informed. In order to enable them to be properly informed, their information must be uncensored. There is no more reason for depriving these people of the liberties guaranteed by the First and Fourteenth [p509] Amendments than there is for curtailing these freedoms with respect to any other citizen

In this case a Jehovah's Witness was convicted of trespassing for distributing religious literature in the town of Chickasaw, Alabama, which was privately owned by the Gulf Shipbuilding Corporation. Company policy prohibited solicitation of any kind, including the distribution of literature, on the privately owned streets and sidewalks. The Jehovah's witness was told she would not receive permission to proselytize and was asked to leave Chickasaw altogether. The Jehovah's witness protested this decision on first amendment grounds and was promptly arrested by a sheriff's deputy for criminal trespassing. The Supreme court eventually concurred in the Jehovah's witness's favor overturning the conviction and noting that the relevant distinction between where the first and fourteenth amendments are applicable and where the are not is not whether a place is owned by a government or private entity, but the function it is commonly used for.

The State (of Alabama) urges, in effect, that [p506] the corporation's right to control the inhabitants of Chickasaw is coextensive with the right of a homeowner to regulate the conduct of his guests. We cannot accept that contention. Ownership does not always mean absolute dominion. The more an owner, for his advantage, opens up his property for use by the public in general, the more do his rights become circumscribed by the statutory and constitutional rights of those who use it. Cf. Republic Aviation Corp. v. Labor Board, 324 U.S. 793, 798, 802, n. 8. Thus, the owners of privately held bridges, ferries, turnpikes and railroads may not operate them as freely as a farmer does his farm. Since these facilities are built and operated primarily to benefit the public, and since their operation is essentially a public function, it is subject to state regulation.

This aptly describes social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube. They are open for use by the general public, without charge, and function as forums for spreading ideas (both religious and secular), engaging in political discourse, and even advertising business the same way we used open public spaces such as side walks, parks and town squares in 1945. All of these large social media platforms are, in fact, public forums subject to first amendment protections. The fact that they are owned by 'private companies', a description which is a misnomer itself, is irrelevant. The entire argument that 'private companies' can do what they want rests on the mistaken belief that there is a single set of property rights protected by the non-existent legal doctrine of absolute property rights, which is found nowhere in the laws of any country, much less our own. Calling social media platforms 'private companies' is also a disingenuous red herring; they are public corporations charted by the states, in which they operate, for the purpose of providing a benefit to the public under their articles of incorporation. They are categorically different from proprietors, colloquially referred to as 'mom and pop shops' or simple fee owners of real property; comparing the two not only makes you a moron, but a belligerent moron to boot.


Thursday, March 28, 2019

Declining Fertility Rate Hysteria Is A Misrepresentation of Statistics

One thing I have begun to notice more of late is fear mongering about declining birth rates, especially by white nationalists and conservatives, but occasionally the centre-left will partake in it. An article in Pacific Standard magazine summarizes this very well. The article cites a total national fertility rate, for the U.S., as 1.765.5 births per 1,000 women of child bearing age, which is about 1.76 births per woman of child bearing age. Since this is below the benchmark replacement level of 2,100 births per 1,000 women of child bearing age, or 2.1 births per woman of child bearing age, the author concludes that we will have a smaller work force in the future, assuming the downward trend continues, and consequently fewer people will be paying into social security (Wheeling, 2019). However, the CDC study cited in the article does not support this conclusion; in fact, the conclusion is based on a bad misinterpretation of total fertility rate. Total fertility rates are estimations of how many births a hypothetical group of 1,000 women would have if the age specific birth rates in a given year remained constant over their reproductive years; total fertility rate is calculated by adding all 5 year age-specific birth rates and multiplying the sum by 5 (Mathews & Hamilton, 2019). Since this statistic assumes that women's current age specific birth rates will remain constant over their reproductive years it is only an estimate of possible final fertility at the end of their reproductive years (Mathews & Hamilton, 2019). Final fertility is contingent on women's actual age-specific birth rates, rather than a hypothetical continuation of current age specific birth rates, during their reproductive years (Mathews & Hamilton, 2019). It is not conclusive that all women will end their reproductive years with an average of 1.76 births. It is also important to consider that the total fertility rate is calculated for all women of reproductive age, which includes all females between 15 and 44 years of age. Within such a large cohort there's inevitably going to be a lot of zeros that will pull down the mean, especially for females between 15 and 24 years of age who are usually still in school. The article also notes that the average age for first marriage has risen to 27 years of age, but fails to see the obvious implication for declining total fertility rates: that a there may be, as a result of delayed marriage, a lot more women with 0 births before age 27 than after age 27. Therefore, the mean may not be the best indicator of how many children women will have, just as it would not be a good indicator of the income of bar patrons if Bill Gates walked into that bar.

References

Mathews, T., & Hamilton, B. E. (2019). Total fertility rates by state and race and hispanic origin: United States, 2017. National Vital Statistics Reports, 68(1), 2-5.
Wheeling, K. (2019, January 11). The U.S. Birth Rate Is Still Falling. Retrieved March 26, 2019, from https://psmag.com/news/the-us-birth-rate-is-still-falling